Screens and Barriers

Peter Prasil

Screens and Barriers is Prasil’s latest solo exhibition opening at Despard Gallery on 27th March, this exhibition aims to incorporate the three elements of Prasil's practice, functional design, furniture and sculpture.

Art Exhibition previously on at Despard Gallery in Hobart precinct, Tasmania, Australia.
From Friday 27 March 2009 to Wednesday 22 April 2009
Launch Friday 27 March 2009, opening at 6pm

Published by anonymous on Thursday 12 March 2009.
Contact the publisher.

Despard Gallery is Proud to present
Screens and Barriers
Opens 27th March 6 pm
Closes on 22 April 2009
Peter Prasil is one of Australia’s foremost furniture design makers, based in Maydena, Tasmania. Prasil originally trained as a tool maker in Copenhagen, since moving to Australia has gone on to complete a Bachelor or Fine Arts graduating with a first class Honours, a Masters of Fine Art and has since gone on to complete a PhD in 2000 from the University of Tasmania. Prasil has exhibited extensively overseas and within Australia, his work is held in numerous public and private collections across Australia.
Screens and Barriers is Prasil’s latest solo exhibition opening at Despard Gallery on 27th March, this exhibition aims to incorporate the three elements of Prasil’s practice, functional design, furniture and sculpture. “My approach to my work is twofold. Coming to art and furniture design from engineering background, which tends to result in my objects to look like non descript scientific instrumentation, both visually and functionally indeterminate for example my “Electric Chair”. My objects are made to appear to the viewer somewhat sinister or even harmful, if only he or she could work out what they do and how they work. In figuring this out, the viewer is forced to some sort of analysis and therefore involved not only on a visual but also on a mental level. On the other hand, my work is influenced by Scandinavian and Japanese forms, materials and construction methods, this show is an example of my interest in traditional joinery for example “Chest of Drawers” that stands not only as a functional object, but also as a sculpture and object of concealment.” Prasil 2009.

Location

15 Castray esp
Hobart