The Indian empire, multiple realities

Selections from the Portvale Collection

Through prints, photographs, paintings and embroideries, this exhibition presents aspects of the Indian empire when patrons were as diverse as Indian maharajas, East India Company employees, and the military and administrative personnel of the British Raj.

Art Exhibition previously on at Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney precinct, New South Wales, Australia.
From Thursday 19 August 2010 to Sunday 07 November 2010

Published by Art Gallery of New South Wales on Tuesday 15 June 2010.
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When foreigners started arriving in India centuries ago, they were captivated by the people, architecture, customs and costumes. By the late 18th century, when the British presence was more widespread through India, artists were commissioned to portray the world the foreigners had encountered.

The imaging of India coincided with the development of new, multiple printing techniques such as lithography and, from the 1850s, photography. These new media enabled Indians and foreigners alike to enjoy landscapes, temples and portraits, produced locally according to varying regional traditions. At the same time, throughout India local traditions of painting and embroidery continued.

This ambitious exhibition presents aspects of the Indian empire when patrons were as diverse as Indian maharajas, East India Company employees, and the military and administrative personnel of the British Raj.