Tipi: Heritage of the Great Plains

Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, Cantor Gallery, 5th Floor

Tipi: Heritage of the Great Plains focuses on the tipi as the center of Plains culture and social, religious, and creative traditions from the early nineteenth century to the present. The exhibition examines the tipi as an architectural form, an expression of Plains artistic and cultural identity, and an interior space for domestic and ritual use.

Art Exhibition previously on at Brooklyn Museum of Art in United States.
From Friday 18 February 2011 to Sunday 15 May 2011

Great Lakes Girls, 2008 image Cradle, 1870–1900 image Doll, early 20th century image Girl’s Moccasins, late 19th or early 20th century image Man’s Moccasins, mid-20th century image Painted Elk Hide Robe, ca. 1900 image Painted Elk Hide Robe, ca. 1900 image Pouch, late 19th or early 20th century image Rain-in-the-Face (Húnkpapa Lakota, circa 1835–1905) image Rain-in-the-Face (Húnkpapa Lakota, circa 1835–1905) image Spear Case, 1880s image Tomahawk, late 19th or early 20th century image Twenty-first Century Traditional: Beaded Tipi, 2010 image Twenty-first Century Traditional: Beaded Tipi, 2010 image Warrior Shirt, 19th century image Woman’s Dress, 1875–1900 image Naomi Crawford (Blackfeet, b. 1935), tipi maker, 2010. image

Published by Brooklyn Museum on Saturday 29 January 2011.
Contact the publisher.

Tipi features more than 160 objects from the Brooklyn Museum’s collection of Plains material, as well as selected works from other museums; objects by contemporary Plains artists; and three full-size tipis, two with furnished interiors.

The exhibition includes objects from a large number of tribes from the Northern, Central, and Southern Plains. Organized thematically, it explores the role of women, who were the owners of the tipi and makers of the tipi itself as well the furnishings, clothing, and accessories kept within it; the traditional role of men as warriors, whose military exploits are depicted on tipi covers and liners; and the tipi as the center of childhood and family life.

In addition to historical and contemporary objects, the exhibition includes photographs of contemporary Plains family and community life and images of contemporary Native American architecture inspired by the tipi form.

The exhibition has been developed by a collaborative team of Native and non-Native curators, scholars, and artists. Nancy B. Rosoff, Andrew W. Mellon Curator, Arts of the Americas, and Susan Kennedy Zeller, Ph.D., Associate Curator, Native American Art, led the team. Tipi is accompanied by a catalogue published by the Brooklyn Museum in association with the University of Washington Press.