EDOUARD VUILLARD: A PAINTER AND HIS MUSES, 1890-1940

The art of Edouard Vuillard (1868-1940) - a painter who began his career as a member of the Nabi group of avant-garde artists in Paris in the 1890s - is celebrated at The Jewish Museum in the first major one-person, New York exhibition of the French artist's work in over twenty years.

Art Exhibition previously on at The Jewish Museum in New York, United States.
From Sunday 01 January 2012 to Sunday 23 September 2012

Published by anonymous on Tuesday 17 July 2012.
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Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 includes more than 50 paintings as well as a selection of prints, photographs and documents exploring the crucial role played by the patrons, dealers and muses who comprised Vuillard’s circle. The exhibition examines the prominence of key players in the cultural milieu of modern Paris, many of them Jewish, and their influence on Vuillard’s professional and private life. Vuillard’s continuing significance from the turn of the 20th century to the onset of World War II are also explored. Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 brings together works from public and private collections in the U.S. and Europe. A quarter of the paintings have never been exhibited publicly in America before. Vuillard’s career spans fifty years. During his lifetime, Paris was the capital of the international avant-garde, the laboratory of new styles in art, music, poetry, and prose. Vuillard had unusually close and sustained relationships with his patrons; some became intimate and lifelong friends. In this glittering cultural milieu he became romantically involved with two fascinating women, Misia Natanson and Lucy Hessel, each of whom served as both patron and muse. Edouard Vuillard: A Painter and His Muses, 1890-1940 traces the entire arc of Vuillard’s career, in which he pursued painterly experimentation in color, media, and ambience, especially in portraiture. Vuillard’s late portraits are a revelation – among the great examples in the twentieth century and of dazzling virtuosity. Experimental, yet deeply committed to the old masters throughout his life, Vuillard maintained a continual tension in his work between tradition and modernism.