Kati Thanda : Green Desert

Aerial photography of Lake Eyre by Peter Elfes

This exhibition is a journey through time into the ancient world of Australia’s desert interior, featuring low level aerial images by award winning photographer Peter Elfes. Peter has spent the last five years documenting the beauty of this rare climatic event, the flooding of Lake Eyre, Kati Thanda is Lake Eyre, in Arabunna country in South Australia.

Art Exhibition previously on at Burrinja Gallery in Victoria, Australia.
From Saturday 18 May 2013 to Sunday 11 August 2013
Launch Friday 17 May 2013, 6.30 pm

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Published by anonymous on Friday 10 May 2013.
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As Australia’s experiences the wettest period on record and Lake Eyre in South Australia continues to fill for a record breaking fourth year in a row, climatologists are predicting another wet year in Australia with the influence of the La Niňa system over the continent, 2011-12 being the wettest years on record. This has triggered a rare natural phenomenon which is changing thousands of square kilometres of Australia’s arid regions, from barren deserts, to a mythical world of brilliantly colourful oases. For the past four years, award winning photographer Peter Elfes has documented Lake Eyre and the Central and Eastern desert regions of Australia.

The Green Desert exhibition is a journey through time into the ancient and mythical world of Australia and it’s deserts, Its infinite horizons and the ever changing landscape has been home to the Arabunna People for thousands of years. It presents the Australian outback in spectacular colour, featuring low level aerial images with astonishing detail that capture the beauty and remoteness of this environmentally and culturally significant part of Australia’s interior.