Hinterlands

Albert Tucker's landscapes 1960-1975

Hinterlands examines Albert Tucker's new vision of his homeland, with particular emphasis on works depicting the bush around his property in rural Hurstbridge on Melbourne’s fringes; the distinctive Gippsland landscape off the coast of south-east Victoria; and the spectacular Barmah Forest in the north of the state.

Art Exhibition previously on at Heide Museum of Modern Art in Melbourne precinct, Victoria, Australia.
From Thursday 26 June 2008 to Sunday 22 February 2009

Published by anonymous on Tuesday 17 June 2008.
Contact the publisher.

Primarily a painter of urban life, Albert Tucker created his first pictures of the indomitable Australian outback when he was an expatriate, living and working in Rome during the mid-1950s. Time and distance had permitted a fresh appreciation of the Australian environment and temperament.

On his return to Australia in 1960, Tucker quickly consolidated this change in direction in his art. Hinterlands examines this new vision of his homeland, with particular emphasis on works depicting the bush around his property in rural Hurstbridge on Melbourne’s fringes; the distinctive Gippsland landscape off the coast of south-east Victoria; and the spectacular Barmah Forest in the north of the state.

The exhibition also considers the artist’s private and unpublicised interests in environmental conservation. In 1971 Albert and Barbara Tucker purchased a tract of land in Springbrook, Queensland; the acquisition enacted an important conservation project and precipitated a further body of work inspired by the pristine ancient rainforest of the Gold Coast Hinterland.