Van Gogh Irises and Roses

Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890) brought his work in Provence to a close with exuberant bouquets of spring flowers—two of irises and two of roses, in contrasting formats and color schemes—in which he sought to impart a "calm, unremitting ardor" to his "last touch of the brush."

Art Exhibition previously on at Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, United States.
From Tuesday 12 May 2015 to Sunday 16 August 2015

Van Gogh
Irises and Roses image

Published by anonymous on Wednesday 28 January 2015.
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Painted on the eve of his departure from the asylum at Saint-Rémy and conceived as a series or ensemble on a par with the Sunflowers decoration painted earlier in Arles, the group includes the Metropolitan Museum’s Irises and Roses and their counterparts: the upright Irises from the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, and the horizontal Roses from the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

This exhibition will reunite the four paintings for the first time since the artist’s death and is timed to coincide with the blooming of the flowers that captivated his attention. It will open 125 years to the week that Van Gogh announced to his brother Theo, on May 11 and 13, 1890, that he was working on these “large bouquets,” and will provide a singular opportunity to reconsider Van Gogh’s artistic aims and the impact of dispersal and color fading on his intended results.