Double Take: Drawing and Photography

The Photographers’ Gallery in collaboration with Drawing Room presents Double Take: drawing and photography. Curated simultaneously across both venues, this two-part exhibition is a unique collaboration between two major, medium-specific, London institutions.

Art Exhibition previously on at The Photographers' Gallery in Greater London, United Kingdom.
From Friday 15 April 2016 to Sunday 03 July 2016

Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image Double Take: Drawing and Photography image

Published by anonymous on Wednesday 24 February 2016.
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The exhibition explores the multifarious ways photography and drawing have been combined, mirrored and contrasted both in modern and contemporary practice.

Double Take is the third instalment in a strand of exhibitions at the Gallery examining photography’s relationship to other media. Previous exhibitions in this series included The Photographic Object: Photography and Sculpture (2009) and Perspectives on Collage: Photography and Collage (2013).

Drawing and photography both offer direct, functional and transparent ways of engaging with the world, while each have also played a significant role in revolutionising developments in modern and contemporary art. The two share parallels such as: the relationship to the indexical, the blank sheet of paper, graphite and silver, the sense of an invisible apparatus (the camera and pencil) and a deep engagement with surface, light, negative, positive and trace.

The synergetic relationship between the two has also allowed each to flourish and develop as artistic forms in their own right. Photography, literally meaning ‘drawing with light’, enabled ‘nature to draw itself’ as describe by Henry Fox Talbot, scientist and inventor of photography in his publication ‘The Pencil of Nature’ (1844): It is not the artist who makes the picture but the picture which makes itself. Photography’s ability to offer a (seemingly) objective and precise documentation of reality and its expansion, both technically and socially, liberated drawing from its facsimile functionality. Similarly, the avant-garde experiments in the early 20th century freed photography from its figurative constraints.