Anish Kapoor is an artist born in United Kingdom.

Anish Kapoor was born on 12 March 1954 in Mumbai (Bombay). He moved to London in the early 1970s where he has lived and worked ever since. He studied art at Hornsey College of Art (1973-1977) and at Chelsea School of Art (1977-1978). His first solo exhibition was held at Patrice Alexandre in Paris in 1980. He quickly gained international attention and acclaim for a series of solo exhibitions at venues including: Tate Gallery, London (1990-01); Tel Aviv Museum of Art (2003); Fondazione Prada, Milano (1995); Hayward Gallery, London (1998); BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead (1999); Piazza del Plebiscito, Naples (1999); Kunsthaus Bregenz (2003); MAC Grand-Hornu, Belgium (2004); Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples (2004); Deutsche Guggenheim Berlin (2008) MAK , Vienna (2009); Royal Academy of Arts, London (2009); Pinchuk Arts Centre, Kiev (2010); and Guggenheim Bilbao (2010).

His major solo exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts in London (26 September – 11 December 2010) was the most successful ever presented by a contemporary artist in London. He has participated in many group shows internationally including those at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, Royal Academy of Arts and Serpentine Gallery in London, Documenta IX in Kassel, Moderna Museet in Stockholm and Jeu de Paume and Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. He represented Britain at the Paris Biennale in 1982 and at the Venice Biennale in 1990, where he was awarded the ‘Premio Duemila’. He won the Turner Prize in 1991 and he received the prestigious Unilever Commission for the Turbine Hall at Tate Modern in 2002, which he realised with the much-acclaimed work, Marsyas. In 2011 his specially commissioned work Leviathan was unveiled in the nave of the Grand Palais in Paris in the Monumenta series.

Throughout his career he has worked extensively with architects and engineers on projects including Tees Valley Giants, a series of five large-scale sculptures created in collaboration with the leading structural engineer, Cecil Balmond. He created the site-specific work, The Farm for the outdoor art gallery of the same name in Kaipara Bay, north of Auckland, New Zealand. Among his major permanent commissions is Cloud Gate (2004) for the Millennium Park in Chicago, considered to be the most popular public artwork in the world. His commissioned permanent artwork ArcelorMittal Orbit is the London 2012 Olympics monument. He was elected Royal Academician in 1999 and has been awarded Honorary Fellowships by the London Institute and Leeds University (1997), University of Wolverhampton (1999) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (2001). He was awarded a CBE in 2003.

He is represented by the Lisson Gallery, London; Gladstone Gallery, New York; Kukje Gallery, Seoul, and Galleria Continua and Galleria Massimo Minini in Italy.